Nature for life

Together with Uffe Holm, Felix Smith and Malte Ebert, Gate To Nature will focus on nature and wildlife in the Masai Mara, Kenya in 2020. Each ambassador has his own case, but with the same goal – to make a concrete difference for Africa’s endangered animals and nature.

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Focus On Plot 92 With Fam. Holm

Over 50% of the nature in the Masai Mara is unprotected. We need to do something about that. Uffe Holm and his family must therefore focus on Plot 92, which is a land area in Kenya.

Plot 92 is under massive pressure ia due to agriculture and potential acquisitions of business partners who want to transform the Masai Mara in Kenya into anything other than the natural gem for which the reserve is world famous. The Masai Mara has a high biodiversity, and is today one of the world’s most beloved safari areas due to its enormous wealth of animals.

Climate Change In Kenya

Along with global climate change, which is causing greater and more extreme fluctuations in the weather, the area in and around Plot 92 is becoming more barren. The animals in the area feed on ia the leaves on the trees during the periods of the year when there is not much food (typically just before the rainy season) Therefore, it is important that we recreate the vegetation that was previously a natural part of the Masai Mara.

The Lionesses Are Under Pressure

A few weeks before the lionesses in Kenya are due to give birth, they isolate themselves and prepare for their litter to be born. They are usually looking for a place where they can easily hide their cubs, among other things. in thickets – well protected from buffaloes, other lions, hyenas, etc. Plot 92 has for generations been an exclusive refuge for pregnant lionesses. That is why it is important that we preserve this area.

Planting Trees With Malte Ebert

Up to 80% of the original tree planting in the Masai Mara has disappeared. Together with Malte Ebert, we can and must do something about it!

Tree planting has primarily disappeared because the growing population in the area has cut down the trees for building materials and fuel. The consequence is that the microclimate changes, that when there are no forests where the clouds can thicken and the rain falls, the area becomes more exposed to long periods of drought, and when the rain falls, there are no roots and trees to hold on to the fertile surface soil. , which is otherwise in danger of flushing away.

SEEDBALLS

In Kenya, the amount of charcoal production has been rising sharply for a number of years. Poor farmers have taken advantage of the lack of guidelines and interventions from the state and the immediate access to be able to generate an income in a market with high demand has made a very big dent in the country’s forest areas. This is of course of great importance for the naturally occurring flora and fauna, as both climate and habitat type change dramatically with the deforestation of the forest.

In the peripheral areas near the Masai Mara are a number of mountains and gorges which over time have formed dense forests and an exciting plant and wildlife. The area’s large human growth, which is currently doubling in a 10-year period, has put enormous pressure on nature and deforestation is a direct result of this.

CHARCOAL

Along with global climate change, which is causing greater and more extreme fluctuations in the weather, the area is becoming more barren. The animals in the area feed on ia the leaves on the trees during the periods of the year when there is not much food (typically just before the rainy season) Therefore, it is important that we recreate the vegetation that was previously a natural part of the Masai Mara.

The trees are planted as seedballs, ie. seeds from naturally occurring trees in the area that was sown, with a small fertilizer pellet attached. 90% of the seedballs we sow in the area turn into trees that are 1.5 – 2 meters high in 3 – 5 years. The goal is to plant 1,000,000 trees by 2020

Close To The Elephants With Felix Smith

According to the Great Elephant Census’ 2016 report, there are an estimated 352,000 African elephants left in the wild. From 2007 to 2014, between 25,000 and 35,000 elephants were killed annually, due to their ivory; it was equivalent to killing an elephant every 15 minutes.

Human-Elephant Conflicts

Besides the poachers, the human-elephant conflicts are a major threat to the elephant population. As the number of poachers decreased, there was an increasing trend in the number of human-elephant conflicts. The conflicts are not only one of the biggest threats to elephants today, but are also a huge challenge, for those who live and live close to the elephants. In 2010, just two elephants were killed as a result of human-elephant conflicts, and by 2016, that number had risen to 12 elephants. Farmers can lose entire fields of crops in a single night, and can additionally have their precious fences and barns destroyed.These new threats result in several challenges, for those who want to both protect the lives of the elephants, and at the same time protect the interests of the local population.

We Put GPS Collars On An Elephant Herd

One of the ” weapons ” used in the conflict is monitoring elephants with GPS collars. At present, 22 elephant herds are monitored, enabling us to track the movements of the elephants 24 hours a day. The data from the collars, which are updated in real time, is a tool that is used to protect more than 600 elephants, and it allows rangers to monitor the elephants and their flocks on a daily basis.

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